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Switch to Sustainable Lifestyle, Avoid another Pandemic Like COVID 19



The coronavirus opened up a crisis for the planet and humanity. It's impacts on health, life, economy and emotions have been and continue to be brutal. However, the Pandemic reminds us of old lessons, many forgotten in the routine of life and work. It teaches us how powerful nature is and we stand very little chance before her. The Pandemic also teaches us how quickly we can change and adapt to a completely new lifestyle if we only wanted to. The crisis reminds us of the scarcity of natural resources and the planetary limits. 

These times call for us to quote the famous astronaut Rakesh Sharma, "Yes, we have ruined the Earth and have done an outstanding job of it. Yes, we should look at sustainable development. But we cannot afford to do things sequentially, but parallelly and make sure that we do not repeat our mistakes."

Restart with Healing the Earth

During the worldwide lockdown, when countries shut down for months, we saw transformational changes that we did not think was possible. Locked into our homes, we realised there is very little that we can be satisfied with. The quarantine showed us that we can consume what is healthy, live with sustainable things, and try to understand the origin and quality of what we eat, wear and use. The air quality improved by 40% - 50% within just four days of commencement of lockdown. We could feel the freshness in the air when the skies turned blue that was rare in metro cities like Delhi or San Francisco. We could sense a feeling of the Earth healing. The absence of vehicles reduced the daily carbon emission to a considerable level. That is why initiatives are so urgently needed on a large scale to make way for sustainable lifestyle options for all persons.

This includes not only specific governmental policy making, societal initiatives but also personal lifestyle changes that start at home and that will help improve the quality of life. This will only be possible when sustainability is taken as a mandatory aspect and a way of ‘normal’ life. When all individuals and their livelihoods are included, only then can we expect the full commitment of the people to make a wholesome change. Because sustainability is not an option anymore, it is the need of the hour.

We have two options before us at the moment. One, we can reopen our economy and go about our business as we did earlier, make more things, rather than better things, without paying any heed to what this might mean for the future of the planet. Or, we can start a new normal. We can start anew, with respect for our environment, towards a cleaner and greener future. 

Sustainable Living Patterns

We need to understand that we are only better if we work together. We need to believe in a global society of humans where helping each other can help us tide over the other disasters that climate change is bound to cause if we are not prepared from before. What we saw in this pandemic is that it is possible for us to change our lifestyle very quickly and without hassle. This is the kind of swift change in culture required at the present moment in response to the climate change crisis. Living in a responsible, ethical, ecological and convenient way is possible. Working from home, once thought impossible, became the norm, bringing about the realisation that we can rise to the occasion only if we want to. Changing the lifestyle, improving the knowledge, and broadening the horizons; all these initiatives are essential. 

However, most of the big changes can happen only when governments acknowledge the threat of climate change with equal urgency as we saw happen during the pandemic. Till then, we can always do our bit and bring about changes at a smaller but vital scale by reducing our carbon footprint. Some of the changes can be made in the following manners:

  • buying organic food 

  • supporting sustainable fashion

  • adapting to sustainable tourism

  • leaning towards natural cosmetic products

  • getting customised furniture from recycled materials

  • promoting more sustainable transport

  • buying better, using longer

  • depending more on green energy

  • supporting fair trade products

We should keep in mind that sustainability refers to the principle of seeking some balance between the availability of natural resources and the exploitation of the same by society. In other words, it aims to balance the preservation of the environment and what it can offer in line with the population's quality of life. There can be no better example of this process than of the food and fashion industry. Here we explore the latter.

Fashion Industry: What it is and what it should be

The fashion industry is characterized by the short life cycle of the products. With each season, comes new pieces, new styles, which end up being “not in fashion” the next season and are thrown out, irrespective of whether they are well preserved or not. The entire fashion industry is driven by the manufactured need to own new pieces every season in order to remain ‘in vogue’. A large part of the current fashion industry is one of the many industrial corners that pollute the environment, from the stages of manufacturing the products to their disposal. As these sectors have expanded over time, the need for alternative sustainable operating systems has also increased proportionately. It is now time to bring about a wave of change by ensuring mass produced unethically made products are rejected. We need to say 'No' to season based fashion and say 'Hello' to evergreen items. Because nothing is ever cheap. Someone somewhere is paying for it.

Some basics of Sustainable fashion

Sustainable fashion is an idea to integrate environmental preservation and social justice. It is ensuring ethical practices are followed throughout the supply chain. For example, it seeks to reduce the amount of chemicals used in the manufacturing process, using biodegradable raw materials, providing fair working conditions for workers, making all products better and long lasting. There are several ways in which fashion can be sustainable, but it is essential to always take social, economic, and environmental aspects into account. Sustainable fashion can take on many forms like on demand or customised clothing, clothing made in an environmentally friendly manner and ensuring fair trade. In some other cases, it might mean keeping a product and using it for a long time, preserving and maintaining it instead of casting it aside at one simple rip. Repair and reuse is the trend that needs to be followed to really embark on a green journey. However, there are times when something just does not give you the happiness it once did. Instead of throwing it away, give it to a friend or a family member, donate it or sell it to a second hand shop. It will be loved in a second home. But if the once loved garment is simply not usable, do not worry, it still can be of use. Give it to a textile recycling unit where the material can be recycled into yarn for completely new fabric. This way, nothing ends up in a landfill. The coronavirus opened up a crisis for the planet and humanity. It's impacts on health, life, economy and emotions have been and continue to be brutal. However, the Pandemic reminds us of old lessons, many forgotten in the routine of life and work. It teaches us how powerful nature is and we stand very little chance before her. The Pandemic also teaches us how quickly we can change and adapt to a completely new lifestyle if we only wanted to. The crisis reminds us of the scarcity of natural resources and the planetary limits. 

These times call for us to quote the famous astronaut Rakesh Sharma, "Yes, we have ruined the Earth and have done an outstanding job of it. Yes, we should look at sustainable development. But we cannot afford to do things sequentially, but parallelly and make sure that we do not repeat our mistakes."

Restart with Healing the Earth

During the worldwide lockdown, when countries shut down for months, we saw transformational changes that we did not think was possible. Locked into our homes, we realised there is very little that we can be satisfied with. The quarantine showed us that we can consume what is healthy, live with sustainable things, and try to understand the origin and quality of what we eat, wear and use. The air quality improved by 40% - 50% within just four days of commencement of lockdown. We could feel the freshness in the air when the skies turned blue that was rare in metro cities like Delhi or San Francisco. We could sense a feeling of the Earth healing. The absence of vehicles reduced the daily carbon emission to a considerable level. That is why initiatives are so urgently needed on a large scale to make way for sustainable lifestyle options for all persons.

This includes not only specific governmental policy making, societal initiatives but also personal lifestyle changes that start at home and that will help improve the quality of life. This will only be possible when sustainability is taken as a mandatory aspect and a way of ‘normal’ life. When all individuals and their livelihoods are included, only then can we expect the full commitment of the people to make a wholesome change. Because sustainability is not an option anymore, it is the need of the hour.

We have two options before us at the moment. One, we can reopen our economy and go about our business as we did earlier, make more things, rather than better things, without paying any heed to what this might mean for the future of the planet. Or, we can start a new normal. We can start anew, with respect for our environment, towards a cleaner and greener future. 

Sustainable Living Patterns

We need to understand that we are only better if we work together. We need to believe in a global society of humans where helping each other can help us tide over the other disasters that climate change is bound to cause if we are not prepared from before. What we saw in this pandemic is that it is possible for us to change our lifestyle very quickly and without hassle. This is the kind of swift change in culture required at the present moment in response to the climate change crisis. Living in a responsible, ethical, ecological and convenient way is possible. Working from home, once thought impossible, became the norm, bringing about the realisation that we can rise to the occasion only if we want to. Changing the lifestyle, improving the knowledge, and broadening the horizons; all these initiatives are essential. 

However, most of the big changes can happen only when governments acknowledge the threat of climate change with equal urgency as we saw happen during the pandemic. Till then, we can always do our bit and bring about changes at a smaller but vital scale by reducing our carbon footprint. Some of the changes can be made in the following manners:

  • buying organic food 

  • supporting sustainable fashion

  • adapting to sustainable tourism

  • leaning towards natural cosmetic products

  • getting customised furniture from recycled materials

  • promoting more sustainable transport

  • buying better, using longer

  • depending more on green energy

  • supporting fair trade products

We should keep in mind that sustainability refers to the principle of seeking some balance between the availability of natural resources and the exploitation of the same by society. In other words, it aims to balance the preservation of the environment and what it can offer in line with the population's quality of life. There can be no better example of this process than of the food and fashion industry. Here we explore the latter.

Fashion Industry: What it is and what it should be

The fashion industry is characterized by the short life cycle of the products. With each season, comes new pieces, new styles, which end up being “not in fashion” the next season and are thrown out, irrespective of whether they are well preserved or not. The entire fashion industry is driven by the manufactured need to own new pieces every season in order to remain ‘in vogue’. A large part of the current fashion industry is one of the many industrial corners that pollute the environment, from the stages of manufacturing the products to their disposal. As these sectors have expanded over time, the need for alternative sustainable operating systems has also increased proportionately. It is now time to bring about a wave of change by ensuring mass produced unethically made products are rejected. We need to say 'No' to season based fashion and say 'Hello' to evergreen items. Because nothing is ever cheap. Someone somewhere is paying for it.

Some basics of Sustainable fashion

Sustainable fashion is an idea to integrate environmental preservation and social justice. It is ensuring ethical practices are followed throughout the supply chain. For example, it seeks to reduce the amount of chemicals used in the manufacturing process, using biodegradable raw materials, providing fair working conditions for workers, making all products better and long lasting. There are several ways in which fashion can be sustainable, but it is essential to always take social, economic, and environmental aspects into account. Sustainable fashion can take on many forms like on demand or customised clothing, clothing made in an environmentally friendly manner and ensuring fair trade. In some other cases, it might mean keeping a product and using it for a long time, preserving and maintaining it instead of casting it aside at one simple rip. Repair and reuse is the trend that needs to be followed to really embark on a green journey. However, there are times when something just does not give you the happiness it once did. Instead of throwing it away, give it to a friend or a family member, donate it or sell it to a second hand shop. It will be loved in a second home. But if the once loved garment is simply not usable, do not worry, it still can be of use. Give it to a textile recycling unit where the material can be recycled into yarn for completely new fabric. This way, nothing ends up in a landfill. 


The choice of raw materials in a fashion house can prima facie determine how sustainable the brand is. Usage of natural raw materials, organic or toxic free dyes, biodegradable packaging are some of the essentials of eco-friendly fashion. In this case, the ideal is that natural fibers are produced sustainably with minimum usage of chemicals. Manufacturing synthetic fibres (polyester, viscose, nylon, etc.) are cheap, but take a huge toll on the environment and are not healthy under any circumstances. 


To take a further step towards a greener supply chain, the use of organic cotton is recommended  instead of regular cotton. The cultivation of organic cotton uses natural methods of controlling pests, weeds and diseases, and forms a part of organic fashion.

There are other practices that help in integrating fashion and sustainability. Efficient use of water resources, both in the cultivation of raw materials and in the manufacturing process, reduction of fabric wastage during tailoring stages, respecting the rights and guaranteeing the welfare of workers, prioritizing small-scale production rather than mass production are some basic essential steps in this whole process.

Practicing sustainability is a challenge for the fashion industry since this is a sector that aims at production and unrestrained consumption. VANYYA is explicitly focused on the creation of sustainable fashion in every level of its activity, curating an ethical supply chain to be a part of the large green fashion revolution that has taken the fashion industry by storm. Hope remains that, as the Pandemic comes to an end, a new era of healthy and sustainable lifestyle resurfaces for the good of all and you choose to be a part of the new fresh era. 

Subscribe to know more about leading a green lifestyle, sustainable fashion and other interesting titbits or simply to be a part of VANYYA's journey.

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